Southwest Airlines has all the earmarks of being crawling nearer and nearer to propelling its since quite a while ago foreseen service to Hawaii.

The transporter intends to make its first flight to the express this week, the airline confirmed Monday.

However, there won’t be any travelers ready. Rather, the flight from Oakland, California, to Honolulu, will be a demonstrating flight that is a piece of Southwest’s push to anchor the “ETOPS” certification it needs from the Federal Aviation Administration to operate long overwater flights with its two-engine Boeing 737 jets.

The airline’s first Hawaii flight is scheduled for Tuesday, “barring any unforeseen changes,” Southwest spokesman Brian Parrish said in a statement to USA TODAY’s Today in the Sky blog.

“Tomorrow’s validation flight is not a regular, scheduled flight and only FAA Representatives along with Southwest ETOPS Program Team Representatives and ETOPS-trained Southwest Pilots will be onboard to demonstrate our long range navigation and communication procedures and equipment,” Parrish added, noting that additional steps will be required to receive the certification.

“Once we pass all phases of the ETOPS application process to the satisfaction of the FAA and receive our ETOPS authorization, we will announce further details of timing for selling and operating flights,” he said.

Southwest had just been anchoring that required certification, yet the exertion got a startling postponement amid the government shutdown that furloughed federal workers, including FAA inspectors.

Speaking during the airline’s earnings call in late January, Kelly said he expected that his airline would be able to begin Hawaii flights approximately six to eight weeks after the FAA approval process resumed. Before the shutdown, he said, Southwest was aiming for a Feb. 1 startup, though it never publicized that target date.

He proposed then that if the shutdown finished inside seven days – which it did – the airline might most likely start traveler flights by mid-March. One potential inconvenience spot, in any case, is that a due date lingers in the not so distant future for another conceivable shutdown.

At whatever point its Hawaii benefit begins, Southwest’s first flights will be from California to Hawaii. Between island flights would come after that, though the airline has not provided any sort of time frame.

For the time being, Southwest proceeds with its endeavors to secure the certification that would permit its 737s to fly between the U.S. terrain and Hawaii. The accreditation – another way to say ““Extended-range, Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards” – is standard for carriers wishing to send two-engine aircraft on long overwater routes where diversion airports are scarce.

As aircraft innovation has progressed in ongoing decades, the certification has turned out to be normal. From the territory U.S., it’s every now and again utilized for widebody planes making whole deal transoceanic courses to Europe and Asia. For Hawaii flights, numerous U.S. airlines as of now have ETOPS confirmation to fly narrowbody planes to and from the state.

While a considerable lot of its U.S. matches as of now have the certification, Southwest’s push to look for it is an ongoing advancement. Since its dispatch in 1971, the transporter flew just inside the territory United States for over 40 years. Yet, that changed in 2014, when Southwest started traveling to a few goals in the Caribbean. It has since extended its impression to incorporate Mexico and Costa Rica, yet none of those flights require ETOPS certification. But, with the planned Hawaii service, Southwest has finally had to seek approval for ETOPS service.

Tags #ETOPS service #First Hawaii #flight #Southwest Airlines #two-engine aircraft